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Ethics of Communication

  • More or Less Equal: How Digital Platforms Can Help Advance Communication Rights

    More or Less Equal: How Digital Platforms Can Help Advance Communication Rights

    Citizen journalism has radically altered traditional news and information flows, encouraging greater interaction and interdependence. What challenges does this development pose?

    by Philip Lee, Dafne Sabanes Plou
    2014

  • The New Ethics of Journalism: Principles for the 21st Century

    The New Ethics of Journalism: Principles for the 21st Century

    This book from the Poynter Institute offers an evolved set of guidelines and principles for journalists, students, and mass communicators, with chapters by 14 of media’s top practitioners.

     

    by Kelly McBride, Tom Rosenstiel
    2013

  • Media Literacy and Communication Rights

    Media Literacy and Communication Rights

    This article examines two opposing perspectives within current media literacy policy, particularly within a European context: ethical individualism and communication rights.

    by Brian O'Neill
    2010

  • Illusions of perfect information and fantasies of control in the information society

    Illusions of perfect information and fantasies of control in the information society

    This article introduces the idea of 'risk societies' to highlight how conventional views of the information economy are confounded by the productivity paradox, uncertain demand for new information and communication technologies (ICTs), and the heterogenous qualities of information.

    by Dwayne Winseck
    2008

  • The Ethics of Cyberspace

    The Ethics of Cyberspace

    In this book, Cees J Hamelink proposes an answer to - how should democratic societies organize cyberspace? - that puts human-rights, rather than profit, at the top of the agenda. He argues that conventional ethical approaches are all seriously flawed.

    by Cees J. Hamelink
    2008

  • Critical cyberpolicy: network technologies, massless citizens, virtual rights

    Critical cyberpolicy: network technologies, massless citizens, virtual rights

    This article suggests that those interested in both welfare theory and welfare policy cannot afford to overlook the emerging interactions between online and offline environments. It explores the main parameters of the debate relating to cyberspace, in particular, and Information and Communication Technologies more generally.

    by Tony Fitzpatrick
    2008

  • Peace Journalism: Negotiating Global Media Ethics

    Peace Journalism: Negotiating Global Media Ethics

    The terrorist attack on the United States on September 11, 2001 demonstrated that we live in an interdependent, vulnerable, and fragile global village. This village, however, does not enjoy the intimacy of face-to-face communication among the villagers. We live in a largely mediated world ruled by government media monopolies or commercial media oligopolies that construct images of "the other." 

    by Majid Tehranian
    2008

  • Social, Ethical and Policy Implications of Information Technology

    Social, Ethical and Policy Implications of Information Technology

    Social, Ethical and Policy Implications of Information Technology focuses on the human impact of information systems, including ethical challenges, social implications, legal issues, and unintended costs and consequences.

    by Linda L. Brennan, Victoria Johnson
    2004

  • The principle of publicity, public use of reason and social control

    The principle of publicity, public use of reason and social control

    This article examines the intellectual history of the concept of 'publicity', originally defined by Immanuel Kant as the transcendental formula of public justice and the principle of the public use of reason, but later largely subsumed under the concept of 'freedom of the press'. 

    by Slavko Splichal
    2002

  • The GII: moving towards implementation

    The GII: moving towards implementation

    A Global Information Infrastructure (GII) is inevitable going to evolve from existing technologies. Developing the GII is a complicated undertaking involving global social, cultural, economic and political structures as well as technical challenges. Universal access, diversity of expression and the right to communicate must be established before a truly global network can be implemented.

    by Pekka Tarjanne
    1995

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Communication rights enable all people everywhere to express themselves individually and collectively by all means of communication. They are vital to full participation in society and are, therefore, universal human rights belonging to every man, woman, and child.

 

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